Mothers and children are waiting for their turn to be vaccinated at the health center of Ambatta, a suburban of Ndjamena, the capital of Chad. © UNICEF/UN0291197/Frank Dejongh

Vaccines are more than a mixture of chemicals that can prevent a disease.

Vaccines mean a healthy and safe future for children. It means ‘hide and seek’ with friends, giggles and laughter after doing something mischievous, excitement of unwrapping a birthday gift, a dream to be Superman or Wonder Woman and so much more.

Every child deserves a childhood filled with such wonderful experiences. Vaccines protect not only your child, but also others around them. 

But 19.5 million children don’t receive even the most basic vaccines, leaving them vulnerable to dangerous diseases.

UNICEF and our partners vaccinate nearly half the world’s children. But we’d need to do even more to protect children, everywhere, against deadly diseases like measles.

© UNICEF/UN0284440/ Alaidroos

A father holds his young child and smiles after the infant receives a Measles and Rubella vaccine during a recent UNICEF-backed campaign.

In the last few months, there has been an alarming global surge of measles cases which is posing a growing threat to children.

Measles is one of the most contagious diseases in the world, even more so than Ebola, tuberculosis or influenza. We have a safe, effective and inexpensive vaccine against a highly contagious disease – a vaccine that has saved almost a million lives every year over the last two decades.
 

 

We go wherever it is necessary to give children a better future. We cross rivers and walk through remote areas and mountains. It is worthy, because immunization saves 2-3 million lives each year and plays a central role in ending preventable child deaths.

Now more than ever, children need to be protected against diseases that were already believed to be eradicated. A vaccine is the best guarantee for their future. You can contribute to give children a future.

With 30$ we can provide almost 200 measles doses for children.